the bluebonnet norfolk terrier club Rescue  DataDawg 2015
Norfolk Terrier Rescue
Norfolk Rescue is an invaluable service to the breed and an excellent way to acquire a companion dog. Dogs are placed into rescue programs for a variety of reasons including family moves, death, divorce, illness, new baby, owner inability to cope with the dog's health conditions, owner incompatibility with the terrier personality, or conflicts with children. Some people may have acquired a dog without considering the long term commitment that pet ownership may require. Before placement a rescue volunteer will evaluate the dog’s personality, temperament, health condition and adaptability. They will provide any necessary veterinary care and rehabilitation. This dog then may be placed in a temporary foster home if needed or adopted directly to a nurturing permanent home selected to provide the love and care it needs. Dedicated and caring volunteers are providing these necessary services to help dogs all across the country. Known biters, aggressive dogs or pets who are simply too ill to be adopted are not offered for adoption. Some dogs are offered for adoption within strict guidelines such as placement in homes without children or any other pets. Dogs are given any necessary veterinary care before adoption. In nearly every case, the pet will be spayed or neutered before adoption. Rescue groups cannot "guarantee" the future health or well being of any dog. But they will guarantee to take the dog back if the adoption does not work satisfactorily for any reason. You will not receive AKC registration papers with a rescue. This does not mean that the dog is not a purebred. However, if you adopt a rescue dog, you can apply for an ILP (Indefinite Listing Privilege), which will allow you to compete with your dog in AKC Sanctioned Agility and Obedience events. Rescue groups very rarely have a puppy for adoption. Usually, dogs are placed into rescue just past the "cute puppy" stage anywhere from 2 years to 13 years old. Norfolk and Norwich are young at heart and generally have a long life span, so you will have many years of love and fun to share with your rescue. We urge you to consider a rescue when you decide to add a dog to your family. It's not only the right thing to do, it's a very smart thing to do. You will be giving a deserving dog a good home and a second chance.

For additional information go to the Norfolk Terrier Club

Website.

Please contact Sue Ely, NNTC for Rescue information or to be considered for Norfolk adoption contact Sue at:  Susan Ely  85-3 Mountaintop Rd, Bernardsville,  NJ  07924 Rescue Phone Number: (908) 766-5429
About About
Links Links
History History
Breeder's Corner Breeder's Corner
the bluebonnet norfolk terrier club Rescue  DataDawg 2015
Norfolk Terrier Rescue
Norfolk Rescue is an invaluable service to the breed and an excellent way to acquire a companion dog. Dogs are placed into rescue programs for a variety of reasons including family moves, death, divorce, illness, new baby, owner inability to cope with the dog's health conditions, owner incompatibility with the terrier personality, or conflicts with children. Some people may have acquired a dog without considering the long term commitment that pet ownership may require. Before placement a rescue volunteer will evaluate the dog’s personality, temperament, health condition and adaptability. They will provide any necessary veterinary care and rehabilitation. This dog then may be placed in a temporary foster home if needed or adopted directly to a nurturing permanent home selected to provide the love and care it needs. Dedicated and caring volunteers are providing these necessary services to help dogs all across the country. Known biters, aggressive dogs or pets who are simply too ill to be adopted are not offered for adoption. Some dogs are offered for adoption within strict guidelines such as placement in homes without children or any other pets. Dogs are given any necessary veterinary care before adoption. In nearly every case, the pet will be spayed or neutered before adoption. Rescue groups cannot "guarantee" the future health or well being of any dog. But they will guarantee to take the dog back if the adoption does not work satisfactorily for any reason. You will not receive AKC registration papers with a rescue. This does not mean that the dog is not a purebred. However, if you adopt a rescue dog, you can apply for an ILP (Indefinite Listing Privilege), which will allow you to compete with your dog in AKC Sanctioned Agility and Obedience events. Rescue groups very rarely have a puppy for adoption. Usually, dogs are placed into rescue just past the "cute puppy" stage anywhere from 2 years to 13 years old. Norfolk and Norwich are young at heart and generally have a long life span, so you will have many years of love and fun to share with your rescue. We urge you to consider a rescue when you decide to add a dog to your family. It's not only the right thing to do, it's a very smart thing to do. You will be giving a deserving dog a good home and a second chance.

For additional

information go to the

Norfolk Terrier Club

Website.

Please contact Sue Ely, NNTC for Rescue information or to be considered for Norfolk adoption contact Sue at:  Susan Ely  85-3 Mountaintop Rd, Bernardsville,  NJ  07924 Rescue Phone Number: (908) 766-5429
Luxury Handmade Chocolates and Pastries